Canadian Institute for the Administration of Justice

The Canadian Institute for the Administration of Justice was created in 1974 at the Osgoode Hall Law School of York University in Toronto, by then Associate Dean Stephen Borins and Dean Harry Arthurs, with the help of a $225,000 grant from the Donner Foundation. Independent, but university-housed, the non-profit organization would function as the educational, planning and research arm of the courts and administrative tribunals throughout Canada.

The administration of justice is viewed as a public service. Strategically placed to identify emerging needs, and to promote research and educational endeavours likely to improve the administration of justice, the Canadian Institute for the Administration of Justice takes a multi-disciplinary approach in identifying and addressing leading-edge issues.

The objectives of the organization are as follows:

  • To be an umbrella organization which brings together, and encourages exchanges among, individuals and groups concerned with administration of justice issues;
  • Develop and conduct directly or by co-operation or consultation with others, research programs with regard to the administration of justice in Canada;
  • Acquire and assist in the acquisition and dissemination of knowledge regarding to the administration of justice in Canada;
  • Advance education by providing publicly available scholarships, bursaries, fellowships, expense reimbursements and other forms of financial assistance to eligible scholars and other persons to be used for the advancement of the administration of justice;
  • Provide for the development and management of programs to assist in training members of the judiciary and administrative agencies, as well as all those who are involved in any way in the administration of justice.

Canadian Institute for the Administration